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My parents are in the process of selling their home in Alpharetta and when they do finally hand over the keys to the new owners there will definitely be a mix of emotions for the family.  Alpharetta was home to me for nearly half my life and home for them for nearly 30 years, so for them not to have a residence there will be a pretty strange thing.  The bright side of their departure from suburban Atlanta is that they have a new home on Lake Rosemound, here in Louisiana, just an hour north of Baton Rouge, so we’ll have the chance to see and be with them a lot more often as they split time between St. Francisville and the cabin in Suches and we are excited about that.

They’ve had the house at Lake Rosemound for almost a year now and we’ve made a few trips up that way, but never for more than a day or two.  It’s rare to find an entire weekend free it seems, but we were able to do just that this past weekend.  We loaded the car up Friday morning and headed north on Hwy 61 after work only to be greeted by a nice thunderstorm upon arrival.

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Amanda took advantage of us being stuck inside to whip up a fantastic shrimp creole for dinner, which I can attest paired really nicely with a Ghost.

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The next morning I was able to take out the new Kilroy DT we bought for Rosemound and see how she performs as a solo boat.  With dreams of big bass in my head I tied on a black buzzbait and began working it around the docks and other structure.  It seemed like a good morning for topwater as it was a little cloudy and not even the faintest ripple on the water from the wind.  I found out early on that the bluegill were going to be fairly aggressive today.

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After a while I wasn’t feeling the love on the black buzzbait so I switched colors and downsized and went with an oldie but a goodie, still a buzzbait, the Wolka double buzzer.  Terry Wolka, who use to frequent the Riverbassin forum, made custom lures and sent them out for guys to try.  I’ve managed to hold on to mine after all these years and have caught a number of fish on it.  It’s still in pretty good shape and is a testament to the quality craftsmanship that went into this lure.

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I’m not going to say that it was like a light switched on, but things certainly were better after the lure change.  I think it also helped that I moved into a shallower, grassier part of the lake, especially given my lure choice.

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The clouds gave way to a bluebird sky and I probably shouldn’t have still been throwing topwater, but I’m pretty stubborn when it comes to lures and I just wanted to catch them on top so I stuck with it and am happy I did.  I really didn’t leave myself much of an option though as my gear was pretty minimalist on the day.  If I wasn’t going to catch them on top, I wasn’t catching them at all.

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For about an hour the fishing was great, which was what I needed, because this was just short pre-lunch fishing trip anyway.

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That last one was the biggest on the day.  I’ve got no clue on the size as I didn’t pack a scale or a board.  It was great to finally dedicate some time to bass fishing the lake and I was pretty happy to have some relative success.  I know there are much bigger bass in the lake and I look forward to the challenge of trying to fool one.

We spent the rest of the day with a lakeside lunch at Satterfield’s in New Roads and then a Lake Rosemound beach trip with the kiddos.  The eggplant nelson appetizer at Satterfield’s is pretty damn good and this is coming from someone who’s not that big into eggplant.  I would recommend stopping there to eat if you’re ever in the area.

The next morning I took Marin for a paddle in the DT.  It was super easy to shift the seat trays from a solo position to a configuration where I could have her facing me, which was perfect for a toddler, but probably not something I’d do with someone who could actually help paddle.

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The DT paddled very well, even with a kid leaning out of the boat putting her hand in the water the whole time.  As with the 12′ Kilroy the DT holds the distinction of being one of the few kayaks out there that is both fast and stable.  I’m thrilled to have this boat at Rosemound and can see it getting a lot of use as my kids grow up.

At Marin’s request we hit the beach again before we headed on back down to Baton Rouge.  We really enjoyed our weekend up at Rosemound.  I look forward to spending more time up that way, learning the lake, and of course spending time with the family.

My cousin got married in Santa Rosa Beach, FL earlier this month which provided us a great opportunity to go on a week long beach vacation.  Baton Rouge has been pretty chaotic lately so it was nice to get out of town for a while.

Our trip started with a stop in Fairhope, AL.  It broke up the drive and we were able to visit another brewery.

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Fairhope Brewing Company has some really good beer, but two of their offerings really stood out to me.  Judge Roy Bean is an excellent coffee stout and (Take The) Causeway IPA is a solid IPA brewed with Citra and Simcoe hops.  I’m a sucker for Citra, so I really enjoyed it.

Fairhope is a pretty cool little town, but we learned that Sunday is not the best day to visit as nearly every shop was closed.  We were disappointed, but at least they have a great little community park in town with a splash pad and top notch playground equipment.  These are the things that get me excited – life is much different than it was when I started this blog – I wouldn’t have it any other way though.

Once in Florida I was able to get in a couple of half days of fishing from the kayak.  Most folks would probably fish the saltwater being so close to the beach, but I guess I’m not like most folks.  I chose to fish a couple of different freshwater spots.  The first was one of the coastal dune lakes that are unique to South Walton County.

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The water in this lake was very tannic which gave the bass and bream a very dark look, almost entirely black at times.  I ended up catching lots of small bluegill on nymphs, but only landed one skinny bass on a popper.  It felt great to get out in the kayak again, it had been a while.

When you first start out kayak fishing and you are in the process of purchasing a kayak, one of the first questions you ask yourself is what style of kayak are you interested in, “do I want a sit-on-top or a sit-in?”  This question for me was a no-brainer for many years and was usually answered with, “duh, I want a sit-on-top, I’m going to be mostly inshore fishing.”

That all changed for me the moment I took a Kilroy on a demo paddle.  It was fast and stable, a rare combination in a kayak; and at twelve foot long, it wasn’t a burden to car-top.  It was exactly what I had been looking for and I wondered if I had been missing out all these years by putting blinders on in my quest for the perfect SOT kayak.

I’m not suggesting the Kilroy is perfect, lately I’ve been paddling a Kraken 13.5 mostly, but I am trying to suggest that if you plan on buying a new kayak just have an open mind.  Sometimes the results will surprise you.  Too often folks have their minds made up with what they think they need and will ignore what is probably the best fit for them – it’s a big reason why the number one thing a new kayak fisherman will hear is “demo, demo, demo!”

So as this demo season rolls around I want to give a bit of advice to anyone out there interested in buying a new kayak – try out as many kayaks as you can and don’t limit yourself to just SOTs, or pedal boats, or hybrids, or even one brand.

Got out again in the Kilroy this past weekend and with favorable conditions on the coast I made the long drive south to fish for reds.  I hit an area that is new to me, but was recommended by a friend at Paddlepalooza.  Another benefit to an already long list of reasons to attend a BCKFC tournament and stay through the weigh-in is just talking to and learning from your peers.  There is a lot that is lost in translation if all your research and knowledge-base comes solely from the internet.

I arrived at sunrise and worked a topwater early, but to no avail.  I was hoping to stumble upon a few trout, but that wouldn’t be the case as the day progressed.  Working Gulp under a cork began producing small redfish.  They were tagged and released and hopefully in the future Tag Louisiana will give me an update on these fish.

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Conditions were pretty good throughout the day.  As you can see, winds were calm and it was very overcast – seemingly perfect conditions to walk the dog, but I didn’t have any luck.  It didn’t much matter as the water clarity was pretty good in the grassy areas and I was able to sight fish reds with either the fly rod or on spinning tackle using a good ‘ol tight lined Matrix shad.

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The reds went from 13″ up to 23″, so no big upper slot reds or junior bulls were had, but it was a lot of fun just catching consistent fish throughout the day.  Most of the fish I caught came on the fringes of the grass or around cuts and points, I didn’t mess around with any of the thick grass.  A few of the fish I caught were pulled from schools, which are always fun to see and hear.  You’ll just be minding your own business when all of the sudden around a point comes a wave of red terror, with bait popping out of the water in front of it, looking for any escape.  It doesn’t matter what you throw in front of the red mass, it just matters that you throw something.  It was a lot of fun trying to pull of the double by throwing the fly rod first, getting a hook set, then picking up the paddle tail and pitching it in the area.  I wasn’t able to connect this time around, but it is always a hoot to have the opportunity.

This past weekend Paddlepalooza XII was held out of Top Water Marina in Leeville, Louisiana.  289 kayak anglers signed up to fish the event, the most ever in the tournament’s history.  Quite an accomplishment to set the attendance record given the weather leading up to and forecast for the day of the event – I feel like it rained every day last week and the weekend wasn’t looking any better.  Friday was lining up to be the best weather day to fish all weekend, so I headed down a bit early and gave myself enough time to fish before dark.

I made it down to Leeville around lunch and got out on the water shortly after.  Early on it was overcast with slight wind, that gave way to blue skies and little to no wind.  It was hard to believe that Saturday’s forecast was rain all day.

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I’ve pre-fished for past tournaments in spots that I wanted to fish on tournament day thinking I needed to make sure fish were there.  This year I changed that up.  I actually had a strategy that I thought may work so I wanted to stick to it, no matter what happened on Friday.  I’ve caught too many flounder and big(ger) trout on Fridays in the past, so I intentionally fished a back-up spot that I didn’t plan to hit on Saturday.  I picked up a few trout, with the biggest going 17″ and got a baby bull red that went 32″.  Fish came on topwater, Vudu shrimp under a cork and tightlined soft plastics.

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That night was the captain’s meeting where I got to see the badass bling given out to 6th thru 10th place at the AFWC.

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I stayed on the water until dark and unfortunately missed out on the annual pastalaya dinner, a real bummer.  On the flip side I was able to maximize my time on the water when it wasn’t raining and got to see a large school of black drum feeding on a shallow flat, their big white tails out of the water waving at me.  Without a fly rod in the boat and fading light all I could really do was watch.

I was woken early the next morning to a light show through the blinds and some heavy sandblasting on the side of the cabin.

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The bottom had fallen out, monsoon conditions were upon us, the seas were angry.  I just hoped it would be done by 5:00am, which is when we could put lines in the water.  Of course I couldn’t go back to sleep, so I got ready in the dark and headed out to sit in my truck at the put-in.  I got ready in the rain and waited for most of the lightning to move on before I took off.  While it was dark I threw topwater at every fishy looking spot, hoping to get a trout.  This was the plan – start with a topwater trout, then move to some productive flounder water, hopefully getting a redfish as bycatch, then head to some redfish ponds that I liked for an upgrade.  You know plans never go how they are supposed to.

No trout came on the topwater, so I switched to the Gulp under the cork, I figured this would be a good search bait, even if it had to be fished slow.  With all the south wind the water in the marsh was high, spots where I’ve always seen the tops of oyster beds were under water.  Water clarity was pretty good though considering the downpour though so I wasn’t too bothered by the high water.  I caught a couple 17-18″ reds on the Gulp.  I thought the first red was a flounder he came out of such shallow water.  Still no trout in my trout spot, so I moved on.

I began fishing some cuts that drained some marsh and led to a bigger canal.  I’ve picked up flounder here in the past (though that was a long time ago).  I was alternating between the Gulp and a tightlined Matrix shad (green hornet).  I made a bad cast into the mouth of a cut that got hung up on a bit of grass and left the bait dangling in the water.  As I worked to free the line the bait got hit and I set the hook.  It was a flounder! I worked him toward the boat, leading him the whole, never lifting his head out of the water, as he got close I could see my jig hooked solid so I flipped him in the Kilroy.  Another great reason to love the Kilroy – tournament fish aren’t jumping out of this boat.  I was stoked to land the 14″ flounder on tourney day and knew that I had the makings for a small slam at this point, but a slam nonetheless, now I just needed to find a trout.  I stayed and worked the likely trout spots where I was at and decided it was time to move when the weather worsened.

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Picture note – I didn’t want to risk taking a picture of the flounder on the water, so I took one in the back of the truck.  These things are notorious for slipping the hands of even the most skilled anglers.

Not catching a trout at the spot where I expected to was a bit of a bummer, but at least I caught some the day before, so I headed back that way to hunt one down.  I only needed one for the slam.  That was motivation in the lousy weather – any other day I probably would have been off the water.  Also motivating was the fact that less than 10 slams were turned in last year, so I figured if I could just get it, maybe I’d be in the money.

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I worked wind blown points and cuts in the marsh and anywhere that had moving water hoping for a trout and I began catching fish, but they were all rat reds.

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Then I hooked into a good fish.  It was putting up a good fight, I knew it was my redfish upgrade, but he just kept fighting.  The longer it took for me to get him in the boat the more I feared he would be too big.

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My worst fears came true, that joker was a solid 27.5″, with the longest tail I’ve ever seen.  Half an inch over the slot.  What a heartbreaker, a nice fish, but no good on tourney day.  All I could do was keep fishing.

So I kept fishing and soon the rain stopped.  But when the rain stopped, the wind picked up, soon enough ponds had white caps in them.  I had to anchor at every point I wanted to fish now.  At a particular point that looked good I was able to pick up the trout I was after.  I didn’t measure him, I knew he would keep so I put him in the fish bag as fast as I could, the last thing I needed was for that fish to jump out the boat.

Now all I had to do was upgrade my fish.  The easiest fish to upgrade is typically a redfish, it is also the fish that will get you the most weight.  It is a key component in a cajun slam to have a heavy slot red.  The one I currently had was no good.  The Gulp under the cork was the most effective bait I was using on the day so I stuck with it.

I picked up catfish here and there and more rat reds and moved a ton, searching.  Finally I got to a spot where some terns (liar birds) were hitting the water in a small pond that led to a cut off a canal.  Conventional wisdom says you can ignore liar birds, but I figured bait is bait and on a day like today I’ve got to at least give it a shot.  Sure enough I picked up a rat red, then an upgrade on my next cast.  It wasn’t as big as I would have hoped but it was 20+”.  Again, I didn’t measure it, just knew it was bigger and got it in the fish bag.

I fished a bit longer, but by this point it was approaching 2:00pm and I had about all of the wind I could take.  I had a slam, got my redfish upgrade, I was pretty happy with how I had done in the conditions.  It wasn’t as heavy as I would have liked, but I thought I had a good shot at top 10.

After a burger at Tyd’s and a shower I got in line to weigh my fish.  I don’t remember exactly what my total weight came out to be, but knew it was somewhere in the 6.75-7.00 pound range.  Some folks assured me it was good enough, others didn’t seem so confident, I really didn’t know what to think.  I told myself I didn’t really care because I was happy how I was able to execute on tourney day and get a slam, and I was, but I’m not gonna lie, I wanted to be rewarded for that long day on the water.  I busted my ass, I wanted that top 10.  I saw it as something that would validate my planning and for following through with a slam on a tough day.

With 88 anglers turning in fish and 7 different categories to fill out, it takes a while to sort the details and get to the results.  Bayou Rum helped that go by, thanks to them for sending down some bottles to sample from.  Everyone was really impressed, personally I enjoyed their new Select series.  Bayou Rum is distilled right here in Lacassine, Louisiana using Louisiana sugarcane.  It was good stuff and you can’t argue with the design of the graphics and bottle, really well done.  Good job Brendan.

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It finally came to results time and a few things stood out.  It was awesome to see a couple ladies do really well, Darla Flanagan and Jennifer Brunning hauled in a couple of stud redfish and finished 2nd and 3rd in that category.  Darla also had a nice trout to take home the Ladies Slam division – a heck of a day given the conditions.  Charlie Jones took 3rd in the trout division, he looked to be high school age, very cool to see a youngin’ making it to the leaderboard.  When they went through the flounder results and my name wasn’t called, I was hopeful I made it to the slam category, but I also knew that my flounder weight was less than 1.65 lbs, so that wasn’t a good sign.  Sure enough, after the eighth place slam was 7.11 lbs I knew that I just missed the cut.  I haven’t seen the final results yet but figure I’m somewhere in that 11-15th place range.  It was very disappointing. Update: The final results are out, my slam weight was 6.8 lbs. I came in 11th place.

For a day when the weather was a factor all day, there were a lot of nice fish turned in.  Flounder numbers were up big time this year from last year. The winning slam size wasn’t any bigger, but we definitely had more slams than last year.  I had a good day and it was disappointing to walk away without anything, but I can hang my hat on the fact that I had a plan, stuck to it, was able to tweak it when things didn’t go as planned, and finally ended up with a slam – which was the goal when I started at 5:00am.  Hopefully next year I can do it again, get some bigger fish and I’ll see my name on that leaderboard.

Paddlepalooza XII Leaderboard:  

Cajun Slam
1 Toby Armand 10.33 lbs
2 Doug Menefee 9.84 lbs
3 Michael Ethridge 9.76 lbs
4 Devon Beltz 9.23 lbs
5 Mark Brasset 8.18 lbs
6 Cody Draggo 7.68 lbs
7 Benton Parrot 7.33 lbs
8 Tommy Eubanks 7.11 lbs
9 Bill Crawford 6.98 lbs
10 Jeff Robinson 6.82 lbs

Redfish
1 Ryan Page 7.71 lbs
2 Darla Flannigan 7.61 lbs
3 Jennifer Brunnings 7.41 lbs
4 Chuck Baham 6.84 lbs
5 Norman walker 6.14 lbs

Trout
1 Darren Kimble 3.86 lbs
2 Steve Lessard 3.23 lbs
3 Charlie Jones 3 lbs
4 Justin Jennings 2.99 lbs
5 Harry Flannigan 2.49 lbs

Flounder
1 Tammy Hartley 1.92 lbs
2 Zack Lemon 1.73 lbs
3 Fred Trahan 1.70 lbs
4 Sam Spear 1.69 lbs
5 Mark Eubanks 1.65 lbs

Leopard Red
1 Bryan Hurst 13 spots
2 Jeremy Jenkins 11 spots
3 Herb Leedy 9 spots
4 Brandon Dozer 8 spots
5 John Thompson 8 spots

Kids Slam
Seth Raspberry Redfish 1.65 lbs

Ladies Slam
Darla Flannigan Redfish 7.61 lbs & Trout 1.63 lbs