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Freshwater

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I had to work in Monroe last week and I brought a kayak just in case there was down time.  Unfortunately there wasn’t much down time and I was only able to get out for a few hours one day.  I elected to spend that time on Caney Lake, launching from Jimmie Davis SP.  It was chilly post-front conditions that day which resulted in some quality time paddling and no time reeling in fish.

IMG_5045 Although I didn’t catch any fish, I did see a few deer, a beaver, and several nutria.  I had no idea they were on freshwater lakes too, but Caney was ate up with ’em.

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I fished a lot of good looking water, maybe it was a case of right place, wrong time, or maybe I have no idea what I’m doing, it was my first time fishing Caney so I wasn’t too bothered to not catch anything.  This is a lake known for big bass and I could see why, even if I only explored one branch of the lake.

The rest of my time in Monroe was spent working, but I did make it a point to stop by Flying Tiger Brewery one night to see how the local beer scene fared.  I went in with low expectations just based on where I was and maybe a breweries location shouldn’t matter, but I don’t typically expect to get great beer from anywhere in the bible belt.  I came away pleasantly surprised as they had several quality beers.  The saison, IPA, DIPA, and milk stout were all very well done, enjoyable beers.  On top of that the building was fantastic with a great big outdoor seating area too.  I’d recommend a stop in there to anyone heading to Monroe.

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On my way home from Monroe I did manage to fit in another short fishing outing, this time on Lake Rosemound.  I had to make sure I could still catch fish and I’m happy to report back that I can.

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I’ll just need to work on catching bigger fish now.

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Last month I got the opportunity to spend a few days working near Breaux Bridge.  In my down time I explored Lake Martin, though not by kayak on the water, but on foot at the Cypress Island Preserve, which is property around the lake owned by the Nature Conservancy.

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In two mornings I covered the entire trail system and can say with certainty that there is no better place in south Louisiana to take someone to see an alligator than Lake Martin.  The clear waters of the lake hold an abundant population of the big lizards.  The fishing for bass, bream, and sacalait can be pretty good too, from what I hear, I haven’t put in the time there to tell you from experience.  It is a beautiful lake, full of Spanish moss covered cypress and tupelo trees.  It’s a place, I imagine, that is exactly what tourists picture in their minds when they think of our part of the country.  The levee trail at Cypress Island makes for a great place to take a walk.

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This video is a bit older, but it’s appropriate right now as I’m currently working on a presentation for the Red Stick Fly Fishers for their upcoming Red Stick Day Fly Fishing Festival that is taking place Saturday March 3rd at Perkins Road Park.  I’m going to be talking about bluelining North Georgia and shed a little light on what is probably the closest wild and native freestone trout water to Louisiana.  The event is free so if you’re in the Baton Rouge area and you’ve got any interest at all in fly fishing come check it out.

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A friend of mine has written a book on the subject of redeye bass.  Here is the teaser on Amazon:

“Do you like fishing secluded, flowing streams that involve hiking and climbing waterfalls to catch native fish? Fly fishing for redeye bass is similar to fly fishing mountain streams for native brook trout. They are actually referred to as “The Brook Trout of Alabama.” Fly Fishing for Redeye Bass is a complete book on redeye bass and how to catch these beautiful fish throughout the picturesque of the southeastern United States. Learn about the rivers they call home, the dangers that threaten those waters, and why some species of redeye bass need our immediate help. Understand how to read water and locate optimum redeye bass habitat, what food they eat, and how to best imitate that food with flies. After reading, you will have a firm understanding of why they are the perfect fish for the adventurous fly fisherman.”

I haven’t had the chance to read it yet, but knowing his passion for the species I know it will be a must-have for any Southern fly fisherman.  It’s currently available on Amazon, but be on the lookout for it in fly shops across the South.

We spent Labor Day weekend up at Lake Rosemound where I had a couple opportunities to get back out on the water in the Kilroy DT and chase some bass.

Saturday I got out just after sunrise, armed with my favorite buzzbait, I headed toward a big flat where I saw some fish holding the last time I was out here paddling Marin around.

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It didn’t take long to connect with a little male, who despite being blind in one eye, knew exactly how to slam a buzzbait.

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The dink bass topwater action continued all over this flat and another and around the grass edges of the lake.

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It was nice to spend a couple of hours catching bass before the sun really began to heat things up.

I made it out again the next evening, but didn’t have the same luck I had the day before.  I only connected with one bass and missed three more fish on the same buzzbait I was using the day before.  I guess I fell into the “one bait wonder” mold again this weekend, but that’s how I wanted to catch them.

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I may not have caught many fish Sunday evening, but I did catch an awesome sunset, which is a fine substitute for a nice fish.