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Monthly Archives: December 2012


The fly of the month for December is a pattern that will catch a variety of species. I’ve seen it catch bass, redfish, speckled trout, even the overzealous sunfish. Blake use to tie up a bunch of regular crease flies, but we had problems getting hook sets on the spotted bass we would frequently fish for. So, the articulated crease fly was born. To be honest I’ve got no clue whether the articulation helps or not, but it seems to, of course that could just be a mental thing. Whatever the case may be, this fly gets vicious strikes and that is what we all live for as fishermen.

Materials: 

Hooks – Back hook is your favorite, relatively short shanked, hook for whatever species you are pursuing. The front hook will be cut off , so I normally go with a long shank eagle claw hook.

Deer hair and flash for the tail

Bead and 65 lb braid for the connection.

Marabou and foam for the body.

Step 1. Start with the rear hook. Start thread, and make a short base. Apply some superglue to keep the thread from spinning on the shank. Tie in a few pieces of flash.

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Step 2. Spin a clump of hair on the hook. I don’t like a lot on there, but the hollow hair aids in flotation of the back of the fly. Tie off the thread and trim the butts to your liking.

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Step 3. Cut out the foam for your body. I made a template that I use to get a consistent shape. To color the body, I use sharpies and my finger to blend it. An airbrush is another option here. Sharpies are surprisingly easy to blend on the foam. I also stick on my eyes at this point using a little super glue.

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Step 4. Put the front hook in the vise and start the thread. Use the foam cut out to measure where the foam body will end. Stop the thread at that spot.

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Step 5. Attach the braid to the rear hook. I like to put a loop through the eye, bring the loop around the hook, and tighten. I have also tied them with the braid just going through the eye and then tying it in. Thread the tag ends of the braid through a bead of your choice. I like red. I’m sure the bead isn’t necessary, but I like how it looks. Tie the braid down on the top of the hook starting where the foam will end and going all the way to the hook eye. Insert the ends of the braid through the hook eye and wrap them back toward the bend on the underside of the hook.

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Step 6. Tie some marabou at the spot where the foam body will end. This is also probably not needed, but I think it adds a little movement so I put it. It also shrouds the bead. Tie down the marabou butts to the eye. This will thicken the hook shank which will give the foam a little more to stick to. Here, I wrap some lead wire around the tail to keep everything out of the way and tie off the thread.

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Step 7. Turn the fly upside down and run a good layer of super glue on the bottom of the hook shank. Take your colored foam body and pinch it together along the bottom of the fly making sure that it is also butted against the shank.

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Should end up with something like this.

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Step 8. Finish up any color that you want. I color the lips red and finish the gills on the underside where the two pieces of foam meet. Mix up some epoxy (if I only do one fly, I use 5 minute. For anything more, I use 30) and apply to the surface of the body and inside of the body. Put on a spinner to dry.

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Step 9. The last step is to cut off the front hook using wire cutters. Completed fly.

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Proof of concept:

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July – Had a great trip to the marsh on July 4th, dodging storms and catching specks and reds. Followed that up with a trip with my cousin and his father in law for some offshore specks where we landed some solid fish. At the end of the month Amanda and I played tourist in St. Francisville, I then made a trip back south for some oversize redfish.

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August – Fished the marsh early in the month and landed a cajun slam on the fly. Then I finally made it back on the river in a kayak with Kevin Andry where I landed a really nice spotted bass. The end of August brought Hurricane Isaac and and extremely large amount of rainfall.

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September – Got on the water, with a friend that built his own skiff, post-Isaac to see what was what and we found out the reds were hungry, and the bulls were on the move. The neighborhood pond was still fishing pretty well too, but the real focus of September was on Blake and I’s trip to Colorado. Fished Rocky Mountain National Park and surrounding areas for greenback cutties and brown trout, it was an amazing experience.

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October – Still in awe from Colorado I started October off with a short wade trip. At the end of the month were two planned trips to the marsh. One was with a bunch of friends from Alabama, the other a tournament. The trip with the Bama guys went well, not as many fish as hoped, but still more than when they came down last year. The tournament was even better as I had the best day I’ve ever had kayak fishing and landed myself atop the leaderboard of the cajun slam category.

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November – Had a few awesome trips to the marsh in November. I didn’t take a lot of pictures, but I did take a lot of video. I can’t remember a time when the redfishing was better than this past November. Amanda and I also took a trip to Georgia for Thanksgiving, had a great time with the family, but didn’t do a whole lot of fishing.

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December – Early December brought a continuation of marsh fishing success. Unfortunately as the month progressed good weather windows became shorter and more limited. I spent that limited time fishing in the neighborhood. I was able to accomplish a goal I had set out for myself at the beginning of the year, 12 different species on the fly in 12 months.

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It’s that time of year again; time to revisit the fishing trips of the year. 2011 was a tough year to follow, but I’ve got to admit 2012 was pretty awesome. From cutthroat to swordfish, I’d do it all over again if I could. Plans are already coming together that might have me pretty busy through Spring; fishing more new water, targeting all kinds of new fish. I’m definitely looking forward to what’s in store for 2013. So, here’s to the new year and all the exciting possibilities that come with it. First a look at 2012, click on any picture below to read the accompanying report.

January – I didn’t do a whole lot of fishing in January, we moved into our new house that month. The fishing I did do was in the neighborhood pond where I caught a few nice bass and my first catfish on the fly.

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February – I went public with this blog back in February and finally got back on the water in the kayak for Mardi Gras. Had a pretty good trip, catching redfish, sheepshead, and black drum.

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March – The bass fishing in the neighborhood really heated up in March, started catching more bluegill as well. Spent my birthday over at Hodges Gardens and made the first wade trip of the year for spotted bass. Squeezed in a day of fishing while on a work trip to OBX and some marsh fishing in preparation for Paddlepalooza, which was March 31st. March was a very busy month.

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April – April Fool’s Day was a great day for reds and drum, but the highlight of the month was the swordfishing trip I went on over Easter break, it was pretty wild. Finished out April with an IFA tournament and JazzFest  down in New Orleans.

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May – May was a pretty diverse month, starting with a trip to the marsh with Pops, the reds weren’t so cooperative but the drum were. Next up were the cats in the neighborhood pond. Then I made a couple of wade trips for spotted bass and hit a private farm pond with a neighbor. Finished the month in North Georgia on Memorial Day weekend wearing out the wild trout on dries.

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June – Fished a good bit locally in June, sticking to the neighborhood and local ditches looking for roughfish. Made a wade trip later in the month and found the longear in full spawning regalia.

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Call me a dinosaur, but anyone else still buy CDs?

IMG_0048I’m not super committed to collecting CDs, but if I’m somewhere that has them, I’ll certainly browse. I’m always on the lookout for studio albums from artists I enjoy, especially those from the late 60s and 70s (should explain my choice of music in videos). I’m slowly amassing quite a collection. Heck, I’ve even got a dedicated spreadsheet for albums I own and those I don’t. CD shops are going by the wayside and it is getting harder to find albums from that era though. I know I could just buy them on Amazon or even download the music from iTunes, but where’s the fun in that? Besides I love having the physical item, kinda like a book. I’d much rather read a book than stare at a Kindle/Nook/iPad/etc. So, I guess you could call CDs a guilty pleasure of mine.