Archive

Tag Archives: Louisiana

I never got around to writing a report until now, but back in June I found the time to wade fish a Feliciana parish stream with the long rod.  I made it on the water as the sun was rising and actually caught a bass on one of my first few casts.  The action was slow after that, but it was, and has always been, time well spent and a great way to beat the summer heat.

The usual suspects were around – spotted bass, longear sunfish, and bluegill, but I also had the pleasure of catching another shadow bass.  This was likely the biggest I’ve ever caught too.  He came off some submerged timber in the very middle of a deep bend in the creek I was fishing.  True to form, he hit a dead drifted crawfish pattern I was running behind a big hopper.  It’s always fun to catch these guys as they are pretty unique.

Google Earth tells me I fished maybe half a mile before I was ready to call it a day and turn around to head back home.  It never fails that when I’m fishing I think I’m covering at least a mile, but in reality it is always much less.  It’s funny how that works.  It makes you wonder about all the untouched water that lies beyond a mile or two from an access point?  How much better is the fishing if I put in the work to get there?

I saw a good weekend day to go fishing a couple weekends back and pounced on it.  The weather looked pretty cooperative and usually if you can catch mild weather in the winter luck will be on your side.  I woke up early and got on the water shortly after sunrise.

img_8644

It was a chilly start, but I knew the day would warm up so I wasn’t too bothered by the cold.  Besides, the winds were light and the clouds were nowhere to be seen, it was looking like it could be a pretty good day to sight fish.

img_8646

The tide was low, which is normally not a bad thing for sight fishing, however this tide was extremely low.  This extreme low had the water pretty dirty.  I knew it was low when I launched, but I didn’t realize that it would continue to fall throughout the morning.  There were entire flats that were exposed that I’ve never seen exposed.  The fish were nowhere to be seen and even when I did see them it was too late for me to make a cast.  Fishing was tough.

I did manage to avoid a skunk though.  Right around lunch I had made my way to a flat where I’ve always found fish.  It is off of a deep canal, so even if the flat was mostly exposed, there was still some refuge that could be taken in the canal for the fish.  Sure enough that’s where they were.  There were a handful of big black drum (they looked white in the water) with their tails up in the canal.  I moved into position and dropped my fly in the path of one of them and he vacuumed it up.  The fight was on.

img_8648

DCIM100GOPRO

DCIM100GOPRO

DCIM100GOPRO

DCIM100GOPRO

img_8651

It was a hefty fish.  It gave me a couple of good strong runs and put a solid bend in the old TFO Mini Mag.  The drum was a square, nearly as heavy as it was long (35 lbs, 37 in. long).  It was a fun catch and I was glad to have caught something, even if it did slime up the boat and my pants.

img_8652

After that I tried to make my way through the marsh back to the launch, but without any water it was futile.  I headed back the way I came, through the bay, and ran into Scott from Bayou Chronicles and his neighbor on the paddle back.  We chatted and fished for a bit.  He ended up catching a beast of a redfish later in the day as I was already loading up the boat to head home.  The tide was coming back in after lunch and if  I were patient enough I probably would have had better opportunities at redfish in the afternoon.  It had been a long day on the water for me though and I packed it in.  There’s always next time I guess.

I use to preach this more, but if you are new to kayak fishing or just shopping for a new boat demo days are far and away the best opportunity to see just what style of boat or even specific boat model you are most comfortable in.  They provide the opportunity to try out as many different makes and models as you feel like getting into.  These events are always free and typically come with store specials that are being run that day or week so they also make great opportunities to purchase a new boat as well.

I helped put butts in seats this past Sunday out at a demo day for Pack & Paddle that was held at Sugar Mill Pond down in Youngsville.  We had fantastic weather and I was able to try out the Blue Sky Boatworks Angler 360 for myself – what a fantastic platform to pedal and fish from.

If you’re in the market for a new kayak do yourself a favor and call up your local kayak dealer and ask when their next demo day is.  It is the best way to narrow down the ever-expanding kayak market to something more palatable. Sometimes the kayak you like best will be a surprise, which is one reason I like to work the demo days, to see someone’s reaction to a boat they may have not even considered.

October_2007047

I wanted to take a moment to profile one of the more unique fish found in Southeast Louisiana – the shadow bass (Ambloplites ariommus).  In Louisiana they are only found in the sandy creeks that drain the Florida parishes – you won’t find them anywhere else in the state.

Shadow Bass Range

I’ve caught maybe a handful in my life as by-catch while fishing for spotted bass or longear sunnies.  They hold real close to cover and don’t stray far from their hiding place to strike a bait.  I’ve caught them on poppers and subsurface nymphs so they are fairly aggressive eaters, like their sunfish cousins.  They are very closely related to rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris) and resemble them in appearance.  Their black-and-white mottled pattern makes them fairly easy to ID, especially when they are the only Ambloplites in the watershed like the ones here in Louisiana.  The pattern can be well defined or somewhat faint, but combined with the big dark red eye they are hard to mistake for anything else.

IMGP2538

IMGP3921

IMGP4880

IMGP5800

IMGP5815

They don’t get very big, a record was established in Georgia at 10 ounces, 9.25″, and I’d venture to guess that is about as big as they’ll get around here as well.

Keep an eye out for them if you do any fishing on rivers and creeks on the Northshore.  If you spend enough time on the water between Baton Rouge and Slidell I’d imagine you’ll run into one one day and now that you’ve read this post you’ll know what it is.