Archive

Monthly Archives: October 2016

We didn’t do a whole lot of fishing that Saturday, choosing to fish the morning at the cabin and then spend the afternoon watching football and sampling the rest of the beer we brought.  Little did we know it would be Les Miles’ last game, but I couldn’t have imagined a more fitting way for him to go out.

20160924_114416_zpsms0a0ey1

The fishing was still tough at the cabin, probably one of the least productive trips we’ve ever had there, but all it takes is one good fish to make a day, and lucky for me that fish crushed a woolly bugger I was swimming through a normally productive run.

20160924_111146_zpst5n78jta

img_9368_zpsovvt8qnr

img_9366_zpsdvbma5o4

It wasn’t a typical cabin trip, but we still had a blast.  It felt good to get out and hit some smaller water this time and remind myself why that was a big part of our trips in years past. I do enjoy kayak fishing, especially sightfishing redfish, but there is something about small stream wade fishing that makes it my absolute favorite type of fishing.

On day two of our trip we set out to fish an old favorite blueline.  It is one of those rare creeks that has all three wild trout species in North Georgia, so catching a slam was a possibility.  We’d have to cover a good bit of water though to do it and to do that you’ve got to hike a good bit on the trail.

Much like the creek at the cabin, the water here was low and clear as well.  The action wasn’t as hot and heavy as at the previous small stream, but I found it fished pretty well with an oversized stimulator.  These wild trout are very opportunistic and won’t pass up a big meal.

img_9325_zpswh2sytwn

img_9324_zps3ucxsw4z

img_9328_zpshunb8nti

Tree cover on these small streams has never been a problem in the past, but it won’t be long before it will start to be.  Damage from the hemlock woolly adelgid was very telling, I saw a lot more sun shining on the water than I use to, those big hemlocks won’t last long without some help.

img_9331_zps0e8ofptl

img_9332_zpsutt2at35

As we moved up the creek we started gaining elevation, the water plunged over a series of falls and we quickly transitioned from rainbow trout water to brook trout territory.  I caught a brookie that had been washed down below the barrier, soon after that they were the dominant species.

img_9335_zpsiy4rsdgk

img_9333_zpsiupw1jbo

img_9339_zps2acwleoh

img_9341_zpsd0vu9wiq

The big pools that normally produce multiple(or bigger) fish were mostly a bust, but I did find one pool that yielded three brookies for me and the biggest on the day.  These little natives are a fun fight on lightweight glass rods.

img_9349_zps6tpnemq7

 

img_9353_zpsscx3c3vv

20160923_144518_zps9zm2rcsz

img_9356_zpstpv6cgqz

20160923_150119_zpsa0f11tt8

img_9357_zps224wdhxv

We hiked out from there and headed on into town to quench our thirst and meet my parents.  No brown trout were caught on the day, so the slam was a bust.  In fact I don’t think a brown trout was caught at the cabin either, which is pretty rare these days.

img_9361_zpsrz42ihnc

img_9359_zpsvtfnozcl

IMG_0076

Blue Ridge is turning into quite a happening little place with three breweries now and multiple fly shops.  It’s a great town to head to if you want chase trout and drink beer in North Georgia.