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Monthly Archives: July 2012

Made a trip to the marsh this past weekend with Blake and his dad. Conditions were excellent for kayak fishing and the redfish were hitting lures very aggressively. I caught a few over slot reds on the day including one that was pushing 30″. Catching larger fish gave me a chance to try out the camera feature on the GoPro and I’m pretty happy with the result. That little camera is sweet.

Sightfishing conditions weren’t the best, water levels were high, clarity wasn’t great, but I still managed to land a red on the fly and on a woolly bugger no less. I’ve got a little personal experiment to see how many fish species I can catch on the woolly bugger. Arguably the most versatile fly out there.

We also chased down a popping cork that had what we thought was a redfish under it. Turns out it was about a three foot long blacktip shark that managed to finally pop the line before I could land it. Probably a good thing. Just another reminder that there ARE sharks in the marsh.

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Fly of the month for July is a variant of Beck’s sili legs. It was a Beck’s sili legs that slayed the trout and ladyfish on July 4th. It probably wasn’t originally intended to catch Gulf Coast speckled trout, but proved effective on Independence Day. As with every fly of the month, this version was tied by Blake Leblanc.

Materials:

–          Hook: Mustad 34007, Size 4

–          Thread: 3/0 Monocord

–          Flash: Pearl Krystal Flash

–          Weight: Dumbbell Eyes

–          Wing: Calf Tail

–          Legs: Silicone skirt material

1. Start thread on the hook. Wrap a smooth base layer from behind the eye to above the barb. Tie in a few strands of flash and wrap them up to a point about one eye length behind the hook eye.

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2. Tie the flash back down the shank to the spot above the barb creating a smooth under body. This also creates a small bump near the eye of the hook that will aide in tying in the dumbbell eyes. Bring thread to the bump behind the eye

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3. Coat the shank with a layer of Hard as Nails and wrap the flash around the shank. Tie off at the bump. I will normally put a layer of hard as nails on top as well.

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4. Tie in the dumbbell eyes, using figure 8 wraps, pressed up against the bump made by the flash. I think this secures the eyes a little better. This should leave you with just enough room to tie in the wing and legs.

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5. Tie in the legs on one side first. Then fold them back to the other side and tie them in on the other side. I like to tie them in on top of the dumbbell eyes. I used the rubber material that I bought from here. http://www.jannsnetcraft.com/skirt-making-material/036620300008.aspx. It’s good for everything, but great for nothing.

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6. Tie in an over wing of calf tail. I try to even the tips a little, but not so much that I lose the taper.

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7. Whip finish, coat with hard as nails. Finished Fly. Enjoy

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Had to share this sweet video from Yonder Blue Films and Jackson Kayak. Aerial shots of kayak fishing via remote control helicopters – does it get any cooler than that? You can get a good look at the kayak fishing lineup that Jackson Kayak offers in the short film. Just to add to the coolness on a personal level, I found out that one of the Yonder Blue guys is also a Milton High alum. I can’t help but think how awesome it would be to have a remote control helicopter with a camera I can use real time to spot reds in the marsh……..

Another corny title, with a touch of alliteration, but Saturday truly was spectacular. Got the invite from cousin Toby to join he and his father in law for some offshore speck fishing. Early on thunderstorms threatened to ruin our day, but we were able to fish around them and pick up a few fish here and there. By the afternoon the storms cleared out and we were able to get to where we wanted to go and we soon began to catch fish with some frequency. We ended the day with around 75 specks, caught between 4 of us, with the biggest coming in around 3 lbs and the average being about 1.5 lbs. We didn’t have to measure a single fish, none were “Cocodrie trout” as Toby’s FIL called them. All our fish were caught on artificials, majority coming on shad rigs. Not being speck fishermen, Toby caught his first and largest of his life and I caught some of the biggest I’ve ever caught, definitely rivaling those I caught in the Chandeleurs a few years back. It was a great time, a good change of pace to hit somewhere new learning some new techniques. My freezer is now fully stocked with fish after Wednesday and Saturday’s trips.

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